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Remove Bloatware Apps In Windows 10


Upon purchasing your new computer, manufacturer's make sure they bundle It with what's called bloatware (pre-Installed apps), all for the glorification of adding extra dollars Into their yearly profits. Sure, many Windows 10 built-In apps are quite useful to the end user, however there's just as many that're not needed. As such, In this tutorial, I will show you how to remove bloatware apps from your Windows 10 operating system.


In terms of bloatware apps, you cannot remove them via the native Uninstall option that's available by navigating to Windows Settings > System > Apps & features. Here's what I mean. I have no use for the Xbox app, and upon accessing It via the above directory, the Uninstall button Is grayed out as Illustrated below.


Why should you be forced by the manufacturer, to keep apps that you don't need? I've tested many third-party uninstall tools to no avail, so I will demonstrate how to remove selected bloatware apps, by using a native utility on the Windows platform named PowerShell. In fact, I will be removing the Xbox app above, that Microsoft has embedded In my OS.

All that's required on your part, Is to enter a simple command Into PowerShell for the app that you wish to remove. I have provided an entire list of commands for bloatware apps, at the end of this article. So without further ado, let's get this tutorial started.

Step One:
I've opened the Windows 10 Start Menu, and will be removing the Xbox app as arrowed below.



Step Two:
This must be done via PowerShell with elevated privileges. To access It, open the Search bar and enter powershell. Then right-click the search result at the top, and select Run as administrator.



Step Three:
PowerShell will now execute, so I've entered the following command to remove the Xbox app. Depending on your preference, obviously It will differ to mine.
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.XboxApp" | Remove-AppxPackage

I've now simply hit the Enter key on my keyboard.



Step Four:
The Xbox app has been removed. Upon navigating back to the Start Menu to see If It's there, as expected, It's not available.



Step Five:
I'll verify for sure, that It's been removed by searching for the Xbox app In the Apps & features settings. As you can see, the search result of No apps found has been returned. This concludes that It's no longer Installed.



Last Step:
If I've changed my mind and wish to reinstall the Xbox app, I can do so via the Microsoft Store by entering apps: xbox In the Search bar, and clicking on Xbox Install app at the top. You can do the very same with your selection.



Final Thoughts:
Given the hardware configuration In computers nowadays, there's very little Impact on overall system performance with bloatware apps remaining as Is. However, as already mentioned, why keep apps If you have absolutely no Intention of using them? Furthermore, Isn't It up to you and not the manufacturer, as to what should be Installed on the PC you paid for? Removing them, also keeps your computer In a more organized manner, so It makes perfect sense to do so.

Here's a list of commands to remove bloatware apps. Enter those that you want to remove, as single entries In PowerShell.
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.WindowsCamera" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.Getstarted" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.Office.OneNote" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.WindowsMaps" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.MicrosoftSolitaireCollection" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingWeather" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BioEnrollment" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.WindowsStore" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.Windows.Photos" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.WindowsPhone" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.ZuneMusic" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.Music.Preview" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.XboxGameCallableUI" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.XboxIdentityProvider" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingTravel" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingHealthAndFitness" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingFoodAndDrink" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.People" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingFinance" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.3DBuilder" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.WindowsCalculator" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingNews" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.XboxApp" | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage -name "Microsoft.BingSports" | Remove-AppxPackage 




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